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CSPAN
Mar 25, 2013 1:00am EDT
>> america a university professor naomi baron is technology changing how we communicate? >> guest: yes and no. there is the assumption that technologies of computers and now mobile phones change the ways that we've right to each other because he supposedly huge use emoticons and abbreviations that we are not using that many but if maybe if you are using a lot if you are a young teenage girl but these kind of better commonly used and not as many as the press with the dust to believe but what is changing is the ways in which we read or write but our social relationships are changing and all also personal and individual psyches. >> host: walk us through those four things. >> guest: how we read. what is clear what you see on the screen with a laptop or the tablet computers or mobile phone or e-reader you don't do it the same way as a hard copy. that is the subject of the next book. i am doing research. but you tend to skim or the find function just zeroing in on the word and you look at the little snippet of what was written and ignore the concept. but we do know that when you read a
CSPAN
Mar 28, 2013 12:00pm EDT
think it's fair to say that society is often very slow to accept rapid technological change and investments. and, you know, i have to say i think part of it is the public's deep-seeded unease with robots. i mean, this goes back to the hal -- [inaudible] and a few other things we remember from our childhood. and, of course, political theater it was, but senator rand paul's filibuster really, i think, did to some degree muddy public understanding of the domestic uses of uas. so we don't do ourselves any favors either from an industry standpoint when we keep changing the names. i could go around this room, and i bet everyone here could come up with a different one. uas, uav, rpv. and now, get this, the latest one? uninhabited aerial vehicles? oh, come on. sexism? give me a break. [laughter] i think our speakers will shed light, though, on some of the more important of uas concern. i'm so delighted that from california frank pace was willing and able to come in, the president and ceo of general b atomics. and, of course, the developer of the predator, among other very leading aircra
CSPAN
Mar 31, 2013 2:45pm EDT
we've got to change the structure because we are killing the very things that made us great. i wrote this book, not anything i hope to get out of it. i hope to awaken people to what happened. we can have that going on. what do they look like? >> well, hank greenberg, truly an icon of american dismissed. this book, "the aig story" is a must-read for those who are can learn and care that he had tended consequences of governmental regulation of industry, particularly financial institution in the future of the american economy. thank you for coming today. [applause] >> now ian morris looks at the development of civilizations of the past 15,000 years and uses current measurement for human development to explain what the center for advancement due from the east to the west. this is an hour and 15. >> good evening. i am heidi hsu, president of world affairs council washington and it's my pleasure to welcome me to the world affairs council domain of world affairs today. thank you for joining us for a discussion with ian morris, author of "the measure of civilization." ian morris is a p
CSPAN
Mar 31, 2013 1:25pm EDT
social change. my background is as a public defender. this seems to me that communication is the vehicle to awareness, education, and to move public opinion to the opinion in the direction of what i am considering a more enlightened point of view. >> guest: in your book to use any of your cases, public defender cases as examples? >> none of the cases i've worked on while i was in the public defender's office made it this far. but i do write about cases that i think have a chance to study, had a chance to talk to the lawyers and had a chance to talk to some individuals involved, a family member to family members of the journalists, so they don't come from my personal experience, but a lot of in-depth study. >> host: that change in dna technology, is that beneficial to defendants? >> guest: yes, it can be. a fellow who is on the jacket of my book, it very aptly named individual. the first person exonerated from death row across the country. 1993. first-person exonerating based on dna. and it came to him as he was reading a mystery novel about dna being used to mail certain. if that could b
CSPAN
Mar 16, 2013 8:15pm EDT
because while times and technology and many things have changed since president reagan was in office, some important fundamentals, those who speak to who we are as americans, have not. i believe that our guest today governor jeb bush understands this. and it's one of the reasons that after having left office just about six years ago he remained an extremely important national voice in the republican party. as we prepare to welcome the governor to the stage, let's first take stock and a handful of issues that we know where of vital importance to ronald reagan and square them up against the words and deeds of jeb bush on the same critical topics today. what are the fundamental issues? we know ronald reagan spent much of his life trying to cut taxes for the average american. he was convinced that it was the man or woman on the street who knew how to spend their dollar more wisely than the federal government and he did all in his power to prove it by cutting taxes. governor jeb bush was in office he cut taxes on floridians by $20 billion. let's talk abut the size of government. ronald re
CSPAN
Mar 9, 2013 9:00pm EST
change of regulation in the united states. i said a foot fall is like a murder charge, trying to explain the severity of the change in the regulatory environment. it did change. sarbanes-oxley brought about enormous change in corporate governance, and companies felt vulnerable, and so they all went to their own lawyer representing them, and what happened is that ceos of companies were really downgradeed in the management of an institution. in some cases, it may have been good. many many cases, it was nod got. when a board is trying to really run a company that's operating in 10 countries where the management knows moment to moment what's going on directors come, you know, four times a year, and no matter how dill janet they are, it's rather difficult for them to have a detailed knowledge of what it is to take to run that company. the management of aig traveled constantly, on the road constantly, and regional executives, the reporting was on a realtime basis. i could tell aig results by two days. i would know anything i wanted to know about the company. it was a realtime basis, so
CSPAN
Mar 31, 2013 12:00pm EDT
change a bit over the years is not terribly much. they are still fighting for them. and i think that's inspiring. [inaudible] >> dina, thank you. [applause] >> thank you very much. >> is there a nonfiction author or book you would like to see featured on booktv? send us an e-mail at booktv@c-span.org. or tweet us at twitter.com/booktv. >> up next on booktv, "after words" with guest host this week, msnbc host s. e. cupp. this week david burstein and his book "fast future: how the millennial generation is shaping our world." in the county argued there are currently between 18 and 30 years of age are the largest generation in u.s. history. more ethnically diverse than digitally tuned in than others. mr. burstein says melinda's are increasing and more influential a fast-moving, more integrated world. this program lasts about an hour. >> host: so, david, your millennial writing about millennials sort of advising town elders about the issues of a generation. that takes some background. how old are you? >> guest: 24. >> host: where did you go to school? where did you go up and why he felt com
CSPAN
Mar 8, 2013 7:00pm EST
. how did the portal correct change that? wire businesses reacting in this way? welcome i think it's helpful to step back and talk about the primary goals. so how is that new number of 32 million uninsured americans when it comes to the system? one is the much talked about individual mandate. every individual in this country with some exception, in 2014, has to purchase health coverage of some sort or they could face a tax penalty. number two, you have heard a lot about the health insurance changes in market places, these were provisions set up in the law for states to step in and establish what is called these exchanges and the place where individuals can go and purchase coverage. for lower income individuals, you have heard like subsidies and credits are important. through these individual exchanges from the federal government will do tax credits and subsidies. primarily for lower income americans for coverage all of this is linked together. you may be able to go to exchanges and get credit for subsidies to do this. all of these provisions are linked together. to be candid, this is
CSPAN
Mar 31, 2013 1:45pm EDT
outside people obviously and some very fine people of the time. all of that change -- to the first part of the book we touch on that. well we meant to the country overall. a couple of vignettes of this that all talk about briefly. a book written on something. a book about a russian sub that went down in the northwest pacific the russians to know where was. they wanted to recover it. code books were important. the technology was important. it was decided they would try and recover. the median my apartment, the general counsel of the cia, is deputy, the deputy of howard hughes. a very large vessel to hold in the center that would scoop this up. then you had to think about what if the russians decided what we were doing was looking for the submarine. what would happen if they fired on us? could not bring this tool id. we knew. put it on the beach. that was not going to work. so we had to take the pacific islands that was obviously in the european position. bill the report. we provided the insurance without operation. there are many gabonese that have the vision was still, the underwri
CSPAN
Mar 14, 2013 6:00am EDT
represents a positive and profound change in the way we approach sexual assault cases. the pilot program provides airmen to report that they are victims of sexual assault with an attorney to represent them. our special victims council program is unique among federal agencies in providing that level of support to victims of sexual assault. this pilot programs primary purpose is to give the very best care to our people. our special victims council operate independently of the prosecution's chain of command. they establish an attorney-client relationship with victims, and they represent on their client's behalf. thereby protecting victims privacy and immeasurably helping victims, not field we victimized by having to endure alone of what can be complex, exhausting, and often confusing criminal justice process. we are in early stages of this program, but we are extreme excited about what the future holds. in december, which render first cadre of 60 expands military attorneys a special victims council. the date you represent about 200 clients in various stages of the investigation, and
CSPAN
Mar 4, 2013 11:00pm EST
people take initiative to change things, for example? last year there was a video that went viral on youtube about the guy that was taking charge in uganda. and i had never heard about that. all of my friends were talking about it and nobody knew about this. and now all of these celebrities are starting charities and i know that there is controversy on where that money was going. but my point is there a way to make the shooters aware of what is going on? >> one of the positive things is all the people wanting to donate. a lot of good can come out of publicity. but you just have to take the killer out of the picture. that's the problem. so i think giving a good example, i did a study with my colleague of people magazine. we looked at every cover from the 70s up to a few years ago. when they first started, it was all about people who did good things. they had people and politicians who did the right thing. medical discoveries, astronauts who did great things, here it is. and over time it started to get very negative. after a while, the majority of the covers were criminals, jeffrey dah
CSPAN
Mar 26, 2013 8:00pm EDT
actually change people's lives and actually changed the culture. it came under criticism more recently for not only reflecting the lives of small business people, for not talking about a working-class women that have no choice but to work all along and not talking about people love of their sexual preferences who may have already found themself out of the conventional life. but what i want to do a little bit today is talk about the ongoing power of this classic. i recently talked this book at nyu a couple of whom are here in this audience who do not ever hesitate to tell me if something is boring and they're important attention. it is amazing to me that the class comes to life and the book spoke to them and interesting ways. i want to talk about the war the feminine mystique and whether it still presses and it's complicated because we live in a world that has been so transformed in this book and in the movement that followed most of us in the room who were born after "the feminine mystique" came out. it's hard to imagine those days at all and i think about the activity of change in my
CSPAN
Mar 23, 2013 8:00am EDT
astonishing insights that blackett's small team proved early on changed their minds. probably dramatic was a calculation the scientists made showing that the tactics the navy had orders its air crews to follow in attacking u-boats -- even though it seems like a perfectly sensible approach on its face -- was, in fact, unlikely ever successful in sinking a u-boat. the navy commanders had actually done a somingly reasonable calculationing themselves. -- seemingly reasonable calculation themselves. they knew how much time typically elapsed between the moment a patrol plane spotted a u-boat and the u-boat spotted the patrol plane and dove beneath the surface. they knew how fast a u-boat could dive. they knew it was of 45 seconds that a u-boat had been out of sight by the time the patrol plane got into position to develop a depth charge, and they figure a u-boat could have gotten to about 150 feet below the surface at that point. so they said, okay, 150 feet, that's the best average. the trouble was, as blackett's scientists realized once they started sifting through this data, was
CSPAN
Mar 28, 2013 8:00pm EDT
. have you been able to change anybody's mind who perhaps was opposed to the bailout and upon seeing the results felt that in retrospect it was a good idea? >> guest: you know we became known as government -- to a lot of people and no question it hurt gm and continues to hurt it today. we did pay back the loan to the government and we paid back a lot of the equity investment the government made and yes i think people want gm to succeed. the government motors label is still there to some extent and it still affects some people but i think it's less now. i think once the indebtedness is totally paid i think it will go away. >> host: in the book you talk a lot about what you found when you are right that general motors. a lot of it was not necessarily apparent to the public. but what you found he found when he started looking underneath the hood. it was revealed very much for the first time in the book. share with us a little bit about to you as a seasoned executive when he arrived in detroit. >> guest: i expected certain things and i saw some of them and others i didn't. the morale was
CSPAN
Mar 3, 2013 3:00pm EST
moral authority. you think about that. the peak of their influence, changing the world. this whole idea of leadership was challenged. you can even argue if you look at this that after they formalized this, they actually lost a little bit and you can argue about the influence. it got me thinking about the world of elected officials that have this formal authority. >> you haven't done time, have you? >> no, i have not done time. but this idea that we have to wait around for the white horse. i have been waiting around and somewhere expecting it was arnold schwarzenegger. he married maria shriver, that was good, then he got in and president obama had been under that notion to the notion that we had to wait around for someone else to solve our problems. it got me walking down this path. what is happening with these popular movement here in america, occupy movement, the tea party, et etc. there is an energy out there. >> we are talking about estonia, south korea, a lot of people in search of innovation at the head of what we have. they're places throughout the globe that have a learning curve
CSPAN
Mar 2, 2013 10:00pm EST
ability to change the perception of the situation in order to moderate people in terms of moving in a certain direction or stopping doing something and power and just creating incentives both sticks and carrots in order to get people to behave in a certain way. >> host: how exactly is it declining, because i think if you asked a lot of people today they would say okay maybe there are new ceos at the top of our organizations that they are still making enormous paychecks and yields a lot of power and we see more and more countries that seem to be emerging as strong players on the global stage. so how is that not just a shift and a redistribution of power? how is what you are saying actually declined? >> guest: each one of the players you mentioned, well paid ceos and heads of states and new countries that are displaying the geopolitics of renowned and have a large say, all of these have power but they have less power than before and they can do less than their successors could do. pick any one of those and you will see they are more constrained. think about the ceos of the banks after t
CSPAN
Mar 26, 2013 11:00pm EDT
machiavellian is modern is the stuff happens. unpredictable, violent change occurs. that's the world we're in. the minute you read machiavellian you're in our world, the world of the unpredictable. the unforeseeable, the violent, the unforseen. and that seems to me a tremendously powerful and modern aspect of machiavellian. equally at the same time as the qaation shows men are not prisoners of fortune. the whole burden of chapter 25 is to say, yes, stuff happens. the unpredictable occurs. catastrophe occur, the around overflows, men are not prisoners of this. they need not be resigned to their fate. it's a very strong emphasis, i think, professor muir made the point about the tremendous point of will in machiavellian. will against fortune. will against fate, will against chance, will against contingency. these are strong and powerful themes in machiavellian. for tuna does not preach resignation. there's not a line of resignation in machiavellian's writing. politicians, in other words, were people in charge of public affairs in florence cannot predict the unpredictable. they can't be sure when
CSPAN
Mar 8, 2013 5:00pm EST
, changing the culture. that was left for nasa to do at their own pace. ra remain committed that they are just as important as the return to flight recommendations and as a matter of principle for the future of designing any spacecraft that the principles are applicable this you cannot allow the guy that is responsible for the scheduled cost and payload to trade engineering safety insurance you just cannot run a risky enterprise not just shovels that anybody so that's all i'm going to say. that is kind of up in the clouds of where we were and then we shredded it down to writing specifics so people could understand and take actions on. we don't want to write something that was so generic you can use it. but we had overarching philosophical viewpoint that for example the management of the space shuttle program was so inappropriate that if you didn't lose the shuttle next week he would lose it next month. the program was incapable of managing a risky enterprise and so then we shredded it down to other things. i'm not going to bore you anymore but i will talk that any part of it that you'
CSPAN
Mar 30, 2013 4:45pm EDT
much. it's a pleasure to be here. welcome. big data is going to change how we live, work and think, and our journey begins with a story, and the story begins with the flu. every year the winter flu kills tens of thousands of people around the world, but in 2009 a new virus was discovered, and experts feared it might kill tens of millions. there was no vaccine available. the best health authorities could do was to slow its spread. but to do that, they needed to know where it was. in the u.s. the centers for disease control have doctors report new flu cases, but collecting the data and analyzing it takes time. so the cdc's picture of the crisis was always a week or two behind. which is an eternity when a pandemic is underway. around the same time, engineers at google developed an alternative way to predict the spread of the flu. not just nationally, but down to regions in the united states. they used google searches. now, google handles more than three billion searches a day and saves them all. google took 50 million of the most common-searched terms that americans use and compared w
CSPAN
Mar 30, 2013 12:45pm EDT
particularly on the theme of social justice and wanting the kind of change that will be better for society and nice to be here in the union and i very much appreciate also the sponsorship of ireland, which i'm very familiar with, a place i have many times visited and enjoyed. it is home for a lot of reasons and i appreciate the fact that you braved the elements and yesterday with such a beautiful day and what happened today that can change so dramatically and so quickly? as i say i feel very at home because i had an early experience of learning about human rights, very early and growing up in the west of ireland, the only girl wedge between four brothers, older than me and two youngsters and me of course i had to be more interest in human rights and equality but using my elbows and generally asserting myself but as i tried to explain in the book because it is good to record, that wasn't the norm. the ireland i was growing up in was and ireland where girls and women knew their place, their place was in the home or in the nunnery or if they were talented enough they could become writers or a
CSPAN
Mar 24, 2013 7:45pm EDT
one could tell that the go standard it can change. two, the brief was profoundly misguided would damage the list for schoolchildren. there is no need to file the brief because the civil rights division are to have implement tenet standard for more than a decade. he did not notice only one of these three initially and consistent points could be right. though all three might be wrong. at the end of the meeting, my recommendation was not to file. i'd written a brief and i acquitted myself, but i can't know conker should be given to the violent. solicitor general bork also recommended not filing. that cost him a lot. he knew this would be his last chance for influence in a subject you care deeply about. but if that discouraging defiance was more important and attorney general bv agreed to solicitor general bork. this one in my hand may be the only copy though perhaps al gore cannot really be retained copies for their files, too. i'm sure earlier tests photocopied by the civil rights division for the benefit of the price lawyers. that group made a stiff wire tape. the supreme court ad
CSPAN
Mar 3, 2013 9:00pm EST
and influence in the book of use influence as an ability to change the perception of the situation in order to market people in terms of moving in that sort of direction to stop doing something and creating incentives both sticks and carrots to get people to be given a certain way. >> host: so how exactly is it declining? because i think if you ask a lot of people today coming you would say okay maybe there are new ceos of the top of the organizations, but they are still making enormous paychecks and yield a lot of power, and we see more and more countries that seem to be emerging as strong players on the global stage. how is that not just a shift in the redistribution of power? how was what we are witnessing actually eight equine? >> guest: it's one of the players you mentioned. well paid ceos and heads of state and countries that are coming into play in the geopolitics arena and have more say than before, all of the players have less power than before. they can do less with it than their predecessors could do. take any one of those and you will see that they are more constrained. th
CSPAN
Mar 17, 2013 11:15pm EDT
results. >> we talk about student vouchers how did you come to the changing our thinking on this interesting topic? >> this topic of felch terse hawk in dove gets people riled up. you want to have a debate you bring up the word of voucher and people have very strong opinions. i am a democrat. i spent my entire life since i was in the second grade and i said what's the difference between a republican and democrat he said democrats care more about, you know, the people that have less and republicans want to make money to the i said well i am a democrat. and i have been ever since. and so when i got to d.c. what education reform should look like and what it shouldn't and where i drew a bright line on the vouchers because in the democratic party we think they are bad because you are taking money away from the schools that need it the most and only helping a few kids. when i arrived in washington, we had a publicly funded voucher program, and people -- it was about to be free authorized and people wanted me to lehane monegan you are the top education official. what do you think about
CSPAN
Mar 29, 2013 6:00am EDT
. all that changed -- for the first part of the book, but the show, what we meant to the country overall, there's a couple of vignettes i will talk about briefly. there was a book written on something called -- a book about a russian sub that went down in the northwest pacific. the russians didn't know where the hell he was. they looked and looked, couldn't find. u.s. knew exactly where it was. and wanted to recover it because it was a nuclear sub. the codebooks were important, and the technology was important. they decided they would try and recover the so. there was a meeting in my apartment in new york with the general counsel of the cia, his deputy, and a deputy of howard hughes. of course, if they're going to do that they had to build a vessel, a very large vessel with a hole in the center that would stoop this sub out. and yet a think about what if the russians decide what we're doing was looking for that sub and knew what it was. what would happen if they fired on us? where would you bring this sub? couldn't bring it to hawaii. what do you do, put on the beach? that wasn't
CSPAN
Mar 17, 2013 6:00pm EDT
was not an easy thing to do because that is going to change some. there are going to be some people who see us, see me in particular as having taken sides. so i often get asked why did you do this? and i think the fact is for both of us we spent 40 years building some capital and a reputation and they're comes a point you feel like you need to use that capital because the stakes are too high, the consequences are great, and we both believe that we are had a really critical point in this political system. we face huge problems in the country. short term and long term. and if we are going to leach the system of problem solvers and in up with people who say things like richard murdock, the new republican nominee for the senate in indiana said yesterday which is my idea of compromise is on the move to accept my position. if that is how we are going to be faced with making policy decisions that are going to be very tough and painful for americans as all major changes in social policy whether the expanded government or contract government do they disrupt people's lives almost by definitio
CSPAN
Mar 10, 2013 8:00pm EDT
think random pain when is a good name? that is what got you in trouble. these are changing times but the importance of storytelling will never change so i will remain cautiously terrified optimistic. [laughter] >> if we went down the dark ages we may have thought this guy was falling since the dawn of time there is stuff we just don't understand and things change. i can tell you how many devices i put my phone numbers and since 1978 and now i cannot remember. some changes, hopefully our health is the most important. it is scary. we don't know. when i was in first grade we would go outside in the hallway with duck and cover. so i am optimistic about the human race and on the day to day basis it annoys me but i think writing is the highest form of transcendence that we have. it is still the thought that counts. >> i cannot tell you how many times i am on a panel about the future of the printed word and there are seats full and people turn out to for this and that gives me optimism. we will survive. the platform if it is the printed word i'd go with the might daughters to on walden
CSPAN
Mar 15, 2013 7:00pm EDT
they will find the courage to change into an underserved report. >> and time is expired so i will turn now to senator graham. >> thank you. this is an emotional topic so i will be pushing back to some of the things that here but having said that, please do not mistake the pushback for an understanding that sexual thistles in the military need to be addressed and improve upon the current system because what we have today is not working. in terms of whether we have a good order disciplined military could see the answer is yes because you see it in the way they conduct themselves in battle. the enemies of this nation have never faced a finer military force than exists today and we have problems. these human beings evolved in our military and there's no justification. i want people to know the best is in the flag of the military balloon color. we are the best in the world. the idea that fighter pilots take care of fighter pilots, we don't talk about that a little bit. general harding, do you know the convening authority? is there any suggestion that he set down the findings because of
CSPAN
Mar 5, 2013 11:00pm EST
certainly be as great as 415 million further behavioral change revealed; in addition to recovery? >> absolutely. we have not quantified the fact you can save money over the long haul but in internal controls into place. >> thank you. i think you're the right line. i appreciate your yielding. without we go to mr. jordan, and returning stars recognize. >> i don't know about that. thank you, mr. chairman. mr. porcari, some have said mr. lahood stier points are not backed up by financial data and may suggest that the faa to 500 elion and 200 million on supplies and travel. i know this is the faa, but do you think that is something they can focus on? >> we could not achieve savings that way and i'll be glad to document why. i'm a first find out what the sequestered means. two thirds basically -- 74% of our department is exempt from the sequestered, which means the sequestration cut followed on a portion of the department, primarily the federal aviation commission. a 5% cut is the equivalent of a 9% cut -- >> my question is does the faa part of your budget spend 500 million a year -- >
CSPAN
Mar 23, 2013 11:30am EDT
the forthcoming book, if mayors ruled the world more should be -- climate change, immigration, and terrorism. this is just under two hours. [applause] thank you so much, kathy. it's a particular pressure, as you might imagine, to have the hospitality of a distinguished center at the graduate center, the center on philanthropy andsivity society, and to also have it with a friendship of a terrific scholar who has been a friend for many years. i owe kathy a special debt in her generous invitation to me to be a senior scholar at the center and bring my small organization with me. thankthank you very much, kathy. it's because of her that i am here today, and here this fall and winter and at the city university. i sworn after i left maryland, having left rutgers i would not go back to the university again, but i'm very glad i broke that promise to myself and that i'm here. it's also a pleasure to be once again on the podium with francis fox piven. we met in the '70s when we were both regarded, even i was regarded as a radical scholar. some might not think it anyone. we were asked by jame
CSPAN
Mar 15, 2013 9:00am EDT
california spend i ask unanimous consent the statement in opposition to tsa's announced change to the prohibited item list that the committee received from the transport unions worker and delta airlines be inserted into the record along with public statements opposing the changes by the coalition of airline pilots association, the association of flight attendants, the american federation of government employees, and the federal law enforcement officers association. >> no objections been good afternoon, administrator pistole. after september 11, 0 planes have been taken down by sharp objects where sharp objects would've been used to my understanding, they're been through a dense as well. spent there was one attempt at hijacking internationally but if you talk about domestically, to have been through. internationally there was one attempting to thousand and. it was a plastic knife. >> and also, zero major stabbing issues with sharp objects. >> zero that i am aware of. >> for me then, that begs the question that we will look at the number of attempts or successes that have taken place in
CSPAN
Mar 15, 2013 12:00pm EDT
be useful and that is i am thinking of prefiguring some memories and the problem it doesn't change much over 40 or 40 years. it's more pressing now and that it's been around for a long time and there were two things. 1i went to and the other i read many years ago that i thought were useful in this respect. one, chief justice burger used to have williamsburg conferences where he would invite members of congress, their staff as well as their judges to discuss all kinds of issues of interest in the judiciary of less interest in congress but some more interested and one year this was the subject, exactly this subject of how could you make the judiciary more efficient and people have a range of papers. testing, all sorts of ideas and i think that it would be perhaps interesting for you or your staff to read. the affair was lee campbell judging the first circuit was on a commission or head of the commission called the judiciary of the future or something and that was written probably 20 years ago in the east sometime and they were considering different ways of restructuring other reforms
CSPAN
Mar 25, 2013 11:00pm EDT
successfully attacked. the scientists propossessed an -- proposed an incredibly simple change involving no new anything. change the deathing on the -- setting on the death charges from 100 feet only attack u boats that had been out of sight for less than fifteen seconds. when they carried out an attack, the target would be at the right depth and the right place. u-boats had a small fifteen second wind dough wouldn't have had time to take action. the scientists calculated it would increase the successful kill rate from 1% to 10%. now imagine if you had approached the military commandedder and said we have the incredible new wonder weapon that is more powerful explosive and will increase by a factor of 10 for success in it would have been astonishing. there was in weapon it changed depth setting. sure enough when the results were implemented it was almost exactly at that. astonishing. it took some convincing to get the change introduced, as you can imagine. when it happened the results were undenialble. that. change along transformed the anti-submarine war campaign from almost ineffectivenesses
CSPAN
Mar 10, 2013 10:00am EDT
time again with casey, with dozenless, with carhart that laws alone without context will not change people's behavior. no offense to the attorneys in the room. but laws themselves do not change people's minds. nothing -- probably nothing that harry plaqueman -- blackman or samuel alito has written is enough to make someone say, oh, okay, i'll do what they say. it's having these ways to change minds is through learned experience, through lived experience, through empathy and through being able to go deeper into conversation and getting beyond the assumptions and beyond the stereotypes about why people access this health service. i had a, i did a radio interview earlier today where the host,-very libertarian and very progressive, asked me what do you think of the people who say, oh, women just use abortion for birth control. i said, well, i think anyone who says that demonstrates how little they know about abortion, how little they know about birth control for that matter too. but these are common assumptions. people do still think this. people who do not flat out disapprove of the ri
CSPAN
Mar 30, 2013 11:45am EDT
history with special prosecutors that changed my mind and converted me to the prospective, the view by the way that is laid out in justice scalia's descent. it was a recognition that the constitution is an appeal to function as a claim that something else would be better than the constitution. that may or may not be true, but it isn't an admissible argument about the structure that we have and that is today's prevailing view. they can claim credit for bringing about that change in our jurisprudence. i've gone on too long but i can't close with one vignette from the post solicitor general. you remember he was locked during the 1987 hearings he wanted to be on the court because it would be an intellectual feast. that sounded like the ivory tower by you probably don't remember the rest of his answer. the book sets out and i quote i would like to leave a reputation as a judge that understood the constitutional governments and contributed his bit to the ways the five described in the committee. the constitutional structure is the most important thing this nation has and i would like to maintain
CSPAN
Mar 28, 2013 5:00pm EDT
effect of civil marriage does not any way change whether the photographer could be sued or not sued. finally, whatever i think we do legally there are going to be people -- we live in a will tick use society. people will bring lawsuits if they are unhappy about something. that absolutely -- without question be discouraged. i think we ought to be thinking about the context it comes up. a debate about civil marriage doesn't affect that particular question as evidenced by where it happened. >> i should add that i believe cato is participating in an amicus brief in the new mexico case on behalf of the photographer. >> it was argued two weeks ago. we are waiting for an opinion. for those interested in the area i have written at some length nearly all the horror stories that come up. come up in states that didn't have same-sex marriage laws. the problem is -- with the tendency of discrimination law. yes. fourth row. >> two brief questions. the first, is in certain states you have common law marriage, does the state have the right to declare two people whether state or gay married who have
CSPAN
Mar 12, 2013 6:00am EDT
comparable. >> you don't think any changes need to be made with regard to that? >> not in regards to the command relationships with the combatant commanders in terms of the forces that are under their operational control. no, ma'am. i do not. >> you think there needs to be any additional legal authority for our soldiers in order for them to train with our partners? >> that's certainly an area that we're taking a look at. right now one of the amendments that present some problems for us is the leahy amendment. as we have to bet the units to make sure that there are no human rights violations, and we are absolute in favor and we understand the value and importance of making sure we could claim human rights. unfortunately, at a time sometimes when those units need of our partnership and our relationship so they understand what right looks like, that the time in which we find ourselves more constrained than ever, if there's a human rights violation, frankly i would offer them more than ever we need to get engaged and make sure that they do what is right. so that's an area that we are
CSPAN
Mar 27, 2013 9:00am EDT
difficult and constantly changing in the general ugliness of american life, must in turn be translated and interpreted and applied to our armed forces. and while it is sometimes true that the political decision, the social policy decisions, the legal or constitutional decisions that emerges in the civilian arena is transferred in exactly the same manner to all military. there are times when it is not. there are times when the particular necessities of national security, or the particular intensity of the organization and values and mission of the military requires some adjustments of rules that we would adopt in the civilian sphere that cannot be adopted, lock, stock and barrel in exactly the same way in the context of our military. we are all deeply grateful to the armed forces of the united states and to those who have served this over the centuries, not just for all that have done, but for the extraordinary commitment over history like many ups and downs, powerful powerful commitment to our fundamental values, to our commitment to the rule of law, to our conception of due process an
CSPAN
Mar 24, 2013 12:00pm EDT
, but there was initiating in the united states about what has changed on the ground in israel and in the palestinian territories, and were each of the player was, netanyahu and mahmoud abbas. there is also the sense that a few the american president you can make anything move, and then you go against reality. it's not enough to be the candidate of change, the president of change. there is certainly out on the ground. sometimes the person of a president can help make things move along. but you have to remember that players on the ground have their own agendas, their own domestic considerations. their own fears and concerns about what they can give up on or not give up on. then there was this moment where hillary clinton showed her loyalty to the president. and without too much to the readers about the flaws, there's this moment where she shows loyalty and enterprises statement that the president has made, and a way that the players on the ground, the palestinians and israelis, feel they are now stuck in a certain position and they have to block that. of the palestinians are sitting th
CSPAN
Mar 6, 2013 7:30am EST
specifically on the prospects and the changes in the security council? separately on sanctions, the issue at present is not necessarily about new sanctions, but effective enforcement of existing sanctions. given his recent visit, does the foreign secretary agree with me that more must be done to insure that countries fully comply with the existing sanctions to which they have already signed up? third, on the issue of international accountability, the responsibility for the crisis as i made clear primarily rests with the assad regime, and the perpetrators must ultimately be held to account. does the foreign secretary agree that efforts to publish the name of syrian officers ordering the ongoing atrocities are vital as they could serve as a clear signal of spent that they will face -- of intent that they will face justice for their crimes and, of course, that includes the use of chemical weapons. fourth, on the issue of peace talks, the leader of the syrian national coalition, last month reportedly offered to engage in talks on a political settlement without demanding assad's resignation. i
CSPAN
Mar 4, 2013 8:30pm EST
are seeing the middle east in particular but the world in the midst of change. i believe that syria is a national and international shame that we have allowed bashar assad to massacre 70 to 80,000 people and we have not done anything about it. it's an unfair fight. the russians and the iranian revolutionary guard are on the ground. 80,000 people at least have been massacred. lebanon and jordan are in great danger of being destabilized and the united states watches. humanitarian aid doesn't get it. it's very interesting if you go to a refugee camp and meet the leaders of the refugee camp and the woman says senator mccain these young children you see through this camp they will take revenge on those who refuse to help them. jihadists are flowing into syria in large numbers. they are the bravest fighters. they have arms and equipment that you are hearing about, a lot of that is going to the wrong people from gulf states. it is a situation which destabilizes lebanon and destabilizes jordan and eventually poses a threat to the existence of the state state of israel and this time the united
CSPAN
Mar 19, 2013 6:00am EDT
, our lgbt stated change project is working in states across the country to support better data collection, better consumer protection, comprehensive and reliable insurance benefits, and a successful implementation of the medicaid expansion. when you look at the affordable care act, you know, those on the right complained that it is a bit of social engineering. and what it really is is trying to ensure that we cover all americans and provide them with good coverage. we should also look at the aca as an opportunity to expand basic rights for the lesbian, gay and transgendered community. all of these reforms have incredible potential to transform our health care system works for people, all people in the united states. but equally important is the fact that as we design a system that serves some of the most marginalized amongst us, we're helping to build a system that is better for all of us. and so as we see this opportunity for social change, i don't we recognize the importance of ensuring that all americans are covered. with that i'm now pleased to introduce our first presented
CSPAN
Mar 8, 2013 11:00pm EST
power to change life for the better of me believe those who are fit not only change themselves, that can be the change agents for people around them. a few years ago is the issue of obesity and other health trends had reached the point where it could no longer be ignored, reebok asked themselves difficult questions. they took a hard look at themselves and ask, would it be accomplished? were sports and fitness brand, but what have we done anything to help? what we realized us over the past few decades, per capita participation has declined. we bought another brands in the industry of arguably created a world of fans versus participants. as they celebrate elite athletes and achievements, they start talking about people in sports and fitness can be to the average person. the next question reback asks is what can we do to reverse this trend? reback decided they manage to change their approach and made a commitment to moving forward would shift the paradigm to change the perception of fitness and to get people moving. this commitment to empowering people to be fit for life crisis no
CSPAN
Mar 16, 2013 9:15pm EDT
and education reporting specifically, is that one. sometimes journalism does change policy for the better in very specific and concrete way small but i think there is something to be said for journalism that permanently complicates or maybe even just momentarily interrupts our understanding of the world we live in. i cannot say that all or even most of the riding that i have done has accomplished that goal, but it is something to aspire to a least. before i go any further, i want to thank the people who let me write about their lives, particularly steward and a mother. it is a teacher and administrator. it was not only i opening to spend time with them, but also a lot of fun at times. i feel privileged. just a brief word about them, people who know marry laurie know that she was always at perry walker a school. you drive by and on weekends commander car is out in front. you drive by at night in a car is out front. you drive by on holidays and a karzai front. yet somehow despite all she does she found time to spend many sunday mornings of me talking about her working life. i used to
CSPAN
Mar 11, 2013 11:00pm EDT
identification of changes in behavior and activity we have got to figure out how to give educators and mental health professionals and families the tools as early as possible to identify and to treat. it does very well in defense of sampsa. they put outstanding tools in the hands of professionals at home, but i'm worried about disconnect now with the resources that aren't available through schools at home. especially, and then for you all who had health care coverage, you seem to be able to access greater treatment and there is a large segment now that are unensured that is going to change. how can we best impact the growing number of insured to make it meningful. >> -- meaningful. >> do you do you want to comment? >> i would. thank you. i want to speak to the problem of lack of insurance or coverage for mental health. in my own case, my son racked up possibly the world's most expensive library fine. i asked him to return over due library books. he completely went to a rage, threatened to kill me and himself. pulled a knife i was able to get the police involved. they had to transport by balan
CSPAN
Mar 4, 2013 12:00pm EST
you want to change that, you need, first of all, the instruments because if you have the common instruments, then you are obliged to do so, but then very much in favor to go in that -- in that direction. maybe they already show that where we do nothing at all, what is a shameful moment, that we are not capable of developing whatsoever, policy, and then deficit and democracy that's through. we have a whole system, vams, a procedure how to tackle problems with a lack of democracy inside the union, that's inside the lisbon treaty. they are in my opinion, far too complicated with too high thresholds before the union, in fact, can act four-fifth majority before you can denounce a number of things on that issue, so i believe that we have to develop that faze fast as possible, and that we need to have the courage to tackle that because that's a problem. we have an intergovernmental system, and you know how it's working in an intergovernmental system. i explained it a little bit making a completely idiotic comparison with the 50-state governments coming together, but if you have 27 comi
CSPAN
Mar 2, 2013 11:00pm EST
we cannot deny the contours' of the change already taking place in your world, the media, a block the newspapers, it is obvious now in hindsight but the music industry and tell monetized saying you're not buying albums in the more we have a wonderful debate about my digitation and flipping feta classroom to expand the classroom. >> host: forgive me, as the governor on the board, in terms of treating citizenship with young people the responsibility of the institutions and colleges? >> guest: i have a three and a half year-old daughter, you all had this experience, she pulled out my phone and i am mesmerized she discovers things i did not know existed. i feel she is a prodigy. >> host: when she and estonia? [laughter] >> guest: then one year ago they start early with pre-preschool in every single one maybe there were not prodigy's but wired differently. the evolution the you cannot educate my daughter like i was educated. the generation of choice you cannot have a row of desks and a bell ringing during ben franklin's time with single subjects in teachers and a mass education environ
CSPAN
Mar 18, 2013 12:00am EDT
united states about what had changed on the ground in and are in the palestinian territories, and where each of the players was, netanyahu, and abbas. and there is often the sense that if you're the american president, you can make anything move, and then you bump against reality, and it's not enough to be -- the president changed. there is a certain reality on the ground. sometimes the personality of a president can help make things move along, but you have to remember that players on on the ground have their own agendas, their own domestic considerations, their own fears and concerns, about what they can give up on or not give up on. and then there was this moment when hillary clinton shows her loyalty to the president, and without giving too much to the readers about the plot -- revealing too much about the plot, there's a moment she shows loyalty and talks about the statement the president has made in a way that the players on the ground, the palestinians and israelis, feel they're stuck in a certain position and they have to unblock that. but the palestinians are thinking, we
CSPAN
Mar 5, 2013 9:00am EST
that electronic method of payment? and how might the strategies and inform changes perhaps at the federal, with federal government payments? we are excited about moving this conversation forward, coordinating with partners across government, and working with industry and the consumer advocacy community to explore new opportunities in this space. so i'm not going to close. i'm sure joe is ready for us to move on, i want to him by calling out our commitment to looking around the bend at what's coming, how the landscape of consumer financial services is changing, and how policy and regulations can help to enhance and encourage innovations that are ultimately empowering. i think there many reasons to be optimistic about the prospects of increased financial inclusion, from innovative financial service providers who are designing new and dynamic products, to the continued march of technology which is constantly reshaping the link between families and their finances. there's a lot of potential. so thank you for having me here today. looking forward to our conversation. >> as the panelist
CSPAN
Mar 22, 2013 9:00am EDT
no changes in the drivers of our debt, the big entitlement programs, the big welfare programs, the interest on the debt, none of those are constrained by this budget, we know the next ten years that are outside the budget window will even be worse. they will be on an unsustainable course accelerating even off the course we're on today, which is unsustainable. so i am really disappointed. everybody that's been involved, everybody that's participated, whether it's a gang of six, a committee of 12, as our chairman did, the fiscal commission, all of those who participated know that the nearly 60% of the money the government is now spending, social security, medicare, medicaid, interest on the debt, food stamps, those programs are out of control. they are entitlements, meaning we have set up legal standards that if those standards are met, you walk into the government office and demand the money, and they have to give it to you, and if they don't, you sue the government. i'm 68 years old. i want my social security check. we can't say we don't have any money. so this is the kind of thing
CSPAN
Mar 3, 2013 4:20pm EST
limited, you can only run for one term. >> are they going to ever change that? does the public understand how that limits their -- [inaudible] >> i think you could probably -- [inaudible] >> actually, the answer i learned is that you have to -- [inaudible] [inaudible conversations] >> still? in this case i'm glad considering that kind of job. how. >> you? -- how are you? nice to see you. good to see you again. >> thank you for coming. [inaudible conversations] >> that's going to happen. >> i work with bonnie. good to see you. >> thank you. thank her. >> how are you gavin? how are you? >> good. [inaudible conversations] picking your brain tonight. i get the scoop, the whole thing off the record. get her a few glasses of wine -- [inaudible] [inaudible conversations] >> we have to do something. >> well, congratulations. >> thank you. on -- >> on your book. i saw you this morning. >> oh, did you? on morning joe? you were up early. i've got to defend these tax increases. i've been on every show -- >> i know. [inaudible conversations] >> it's unbelievable. i'm impressed how you keep
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